Autumn is now in full swing and despite being blessed with some much-needed sunshine during daylight hours, the nighttime temperature has dropped dramatically. The knock-on effect is a rapid increase in energy consumption as UK homes crank up the central heating and bask in sub-tropical temperatures throughout the festive season, but what is the ideal home temperature? Research shows that the average household thermostat is set at 23°C (or 73°F) which is a degree or two warmer than your average summer day in the south of England.

A report commissioned by the Government found the average temperature of UK homes to be 17°C during the Winter – four degrees warmer than in 1970. This may not come as a huge surprise considering central heating, double glazing and insulation are now being added to older, draughtier homes, but should the average indoor temperature continue to rise or could this be damaging to our health and the environment. Additionally, is there an ideal temperature to maximise comfort, efficiency and productivity?

According to a recent survey conducted by emergency repair firm HomeServe, the ideal temperature for health and wellbeing is between 18°C and 21°C and this view is supported by a similar survey conducted by the Energy Saving Trust. However, the government go one step further and suggest an ideal temperature for individual rooms around the house:

 

Temperature in FahrenheitTemperature in Celsius
Bedrooms

65 degrees

18 degrees

Living Room

70 degrees

21 degrees

Dining Room

70 degrees

21 degrees

Kitchen

68 degrees

20 degrees

Bathroom

70 degrees

21 degrees

Hallways & Toilets

65 degrees

18 degrees

 

There have been many studies into how temperatures affect people, but ultimately everyone is different. Here are some facts to assist you with finding your ideal room temperature:

  • The World Health Organisation suggest a temperature of 18°C for healthy people, 16°C for those with respiratory problems or allergies and 20°C for the elderly, sick or disabled.
  • Before you fall asleep, your body temperature drops significantly to promote deep continuous sleep; setting your bedroom thermostat to 18°C will allow your body to reach that temperature faster and therefore you will fall asleep more quickly and sleep better.
  • Temperatures below 12°C and above 23°C have been proven to disrupt your sleep.
  • Temperatures above 25°C can make you lethargic and have a negative effect on productivity.
  • The average room temperature in the workplace is 22°C and statistics claim this to be the optimal temperature for comfort and productivity.
  • Turning your thermostat up by 1°C will increase your annual heating bills by £65.

Mould in the Home The Ideal Home TemperatureHowever, it’s also worth noting how different temperatures affect your home. For example, if the room temperature is reduced to 8°C, the air in the room can only absorb 50% of the moisture. The other 50% ends up as condensation on the outside walls and this can promote mould growth which not only damages the paintwork but can also lead to respiratory problems. Equally if you set the room temperature too high it can cause the room to sweat and this will promote mould growth and aid with the spread of bacteria. Whatever the temperature, it’s important to maintain constant ventilation to promote good airflow around the home as this will prevent damp and is beneficial to our health.

If you are experiencing problems with your heating or are looking to reduce your energy bills, why not contact CPM Heating Engineers. We specialise in all aspects of heating including boiler repair and installation, radiators and a range of energy efficient solutions. Our team of specialists offer professional heating services in Mid & East Devon and parts of Somerset. Contact us online or call 01392 363999 for your local heating experts.